Thursday, July 17, 2008

I think I'm a little bit in love...

I can't deny it anymore.

I keep looking at this photo...and my heart just goes pitter pat.

update: It's not love. It's pure, unadulterated lust.

30 comments:

The Duck said...

That is completely understandable, & I'm sure Mike would understand.
;-)

mattcaron said...

I've got one. Threw and extended mag release and Choate pistol grip stock. Link to an article w/ pictures

New Jovian Thunderbolt said...

Why do you have to get one of those newfangled jobs? What's wrond with a Model 62, or some other Browning design?

Kids today.

Breda said...

it's so pretty...*swoon*

TD said...

Pretty and designed by JMB himself.

redneckinny said...

Oooh...purty. What caliber, make and model?

falnfenix said...

yes, the black laminate is pretty, but did you see the BLUE??

WeisenHeimer Brainstorm said...

I like this one http://cz-usa.com/product_detail.php?id=7

Bob said...

I favor this sweet old design, myself. It's a single-shot, so you learn real rifle discipline. And look at the old-world grace of it.

kaveman said...

I gots one of those, bought it about 15 years ago. She no worky though, it's the last gun I need to take to the gunsmith.

zeeke42 said...

Go for it. Put some tech-sights (www.tech-sights.com) and a sling on it and go to an appleseed shoot to learn how to shoot it. (www.appleseedinfo.org) Women shoot free for the rest of 2008.

Steve Skubinna said...

Got one with in stainless, long barrel, with a walnut stock. Put in a Volqartson trigger group, stuck a Simmons scope on top and a Harris bipod and it's a terrific little tack driver.

And I make up for all the money I sunk into what was originally a $200 rifle by shooting all day long with ammo that costs about ten bucks for a box of 500.

You won't go wrong with a 10/22. And, it's a good gun to teach kids marksmanship with.

Brad said...

Just bought one a few months ago for the purpose of teaching my daughter and nephew how to shoot (they both recently turned 9).

Be prepared to spend a few additional bucks at Volquartsen Custom if you take the plunge. The first two times I took it out, it failed to eject about every 4th to 6th round. I read up a bit and purchased a new ejector from Volquartsen (along with the extended mag release, improved bolt catch and rubberized bolt stop).

The next range trip was much more fun, no more jams, although I was a bit bummed I had to spend another $50 on a brand new rifle to get it to work properly.

Then I took the kids out to shoot a gun for the first time in their lives. The smiles on their faces made the additional cash and hassle well worth it. My daughter's paper plate with her autograph and 10 holes in it is still proudly hanging from my fridge.

Robert said...

My Dad bought me one back in '67 or so, last century. I've added a Hogue overmolded stock, Volquartzen trigger parts, Titan match barrel and a BSA Platinum scope. Pretty fun gun at this point.

Don T. said...

I'm with brad on replacing the OEM steel bolt stop right away. The Volquartsen Recoil Buffers are selling for about $11.00 now. They're easy to replace at home, and keep the steel pin from wrecking the aluminum receiver as the bolt cycles. I bought mine in 1998 and haven't had to replace it yet!

redneckinny- It's a Ruger 10/22. I presume .22 rimfire, but it comes in .22 WMR, and .17 HMR too.

Robert said...

Bread is going to have to learn the difference between gun love and gun lust. Gun love gets you a K31. Gun lust gets you 5 K31s, 4 Garands, assorted 22s, a box full of pistols, et, et.

I posted a photo of MY 10/22 over at http://blackforkblog.blogspot.com/

Jack Gordon said...

My uncle gave me a 10/22 when I was in high school. They are awesome, awesome guns. Fun, affordable to buy and shoot, and eminently customizable. You really can't go wrong buying one.

Buckshot said...

Guys,

I am trying to talk her into going to an Appleseed shoot and she is looking for rifles for that.

She needs something semi-auto (or bolt action, but harder to do with no experience) and a detachable box magazine since there are rapid fire strings.

Breda,

Take a look at Wal-mart if you have one in your area that still sells guns, they have some Wal-mart models different from what Ruger makes for straight sale or Davidsons' that you might like also.

Buckshot

cocked and loaded said...

I've had one for 20 years and I
still love it.

Earl said...

Go slow, but accurate - there isn't a war on yet. I have two single shot .22, one pump .22 and they each have their own beauty, and I enjoy cuddling up with them and shooting. I never think I need to hurry with a twenty-two - the rabbits and squirrels just aren't that interested in trying to overwhelm me.

redneckinny said...

My first real gun is a Remington 552 Speedmaster. I got it right after 9/11 happened. My collection has grown a bit since then. The only thing I did to that rifle was add a scope. I gotta take it out one of these days. It's a pretty sweet setup and holds 15 Long Rifle rounds in the tube. Gotta get my ass out to the range one of these days when it's not freaking 90* out. My friend had a tricked out 10/22 that he sold for only $350. I wish I had bought it from him.

Anonymous said...

The 10/22 is wondrefull everyone should have one. Keep it clean and malfunctions are rare at least with mine. Try to wear one out I dare ya. Too bad there not belt fed.

Bruce said...

Buy two and you can do this

Tam said...

They've done that same gun (gray-green laminate & stainless) with a Mannlicher stock. It makes my heart go "pitter pat".

Steve Skubinna said...

Okay, I am serious here Breda, if the chorus of affirmation has not convinced you to get a 10/22, you can turn in your spurs and quit the Unorganized Militia. They are not expensive, are fun and cheap to shoot, and for every snob who sneers at .22 LR, you'll find a dozen or more shooters who like it for practice, plinking, varmint control, or instruction.

The military for years used .22s for initial marksmanship instruction (well, by "military" it was probably more common with the Navy and AF - the Army and Marines start everyone out with a service rifle).

The same habits you make shooting a 10/22 will stand you in good stead if you ever want to shoot a larger caliber rifle, but if all you want is to shoot targets, one will serve you for life.

If the teeny-weeny price tag is a hurdle, do another bleg. See how much your readers think you deserve it.

Tam said...

Did I, by the way, mention that a 10/22 was my very first gun, purchased at Oshman's at Cumberland Mall shortly after my 18th birthday?

That was a big hit when I got home, let me tell you...

"Hey, Mom, you'll never guess what I found on sale at the mall today!"

Steve Skubinna said...

Do you still have the gun, Tam?

Tam said...

No, but I've owned, like, four or five 10/22's since then, and I'm sure I'll own another someday.

Xavier said...

I'm a big fan of the 10/22.

You can't buy just one, be careful opening up that pandora's box......

Sokmnkee said...

I bought that same gun for my hubby for Christmas a few years back. He was stoked. Oh yeah, we're a multi-gun couple. Home security--we have it.