Monday, August 10, 2009

corny

For those of you lucky enough to have gotten some farm fresh sweet corn from Frank W. James at yesterday's Indy blogmeet, I'd suggest you peel off the husks, rinse off the ears, wrap them in foil with Spanish olive oil, fresh rosemary, cracked black pepper and sea salt and then slowly grill until the kernels are brown and caramelized.

We had this for dinner last night and wow...it was so delicious it was worth the bellyache.

4 comments:

Sailorcurt said...

My favorite way to do fresh corn is the old "camp--out" method:

Leave the corn in the husks. Soak them in water for at least an hour. I usually soak them for 2 to 3 hours to make sure the husks are plenty moist...this keeps them from burning too quickly.

Cook them on the grill or over an open flame. If doing them on the grill, it needs to be very hot. Open flame is preferred.

Cook them until the outside husks are nice and burnt, turning often. It usually takes about ten or fifteen minutes for them to cook completely, but it depends on the heat of your cooking source. In my opinion, you get much better results with an open flame.

After the outside husks are burnt, pull them off the flame and let the cool for a few minutes. Have a trash can handy for the husks. Shuck them and season to taste right before eating.

Basically, the corn kernels steam in their own juices. You get nice, crisp corn that is very flavorful.

MMMMMM!

Tam said...

Droooool!

We're planning on tossing a bunch of ears on the grill tonight. I think this sounds like a splendid idea! :D

Old NFO said...

Oh that sounds good! I've never tried that seasoning, but I will when (if) I ever get home... sigh...

jdege said...

The real trick to top-notch corn-on-the-cob is freshness.

Bring the water to a boil, then go pick the corn. Run back, husking as you go, and throw it into the water.

I've been told the sugars in corn start converting to starches within fifteen minutes of picking. I can't say whether that's true, but I can say that there is a real difference between corn that is freshly-picked and corn that is a couple of hours old.